The New South and the New Immigrant, Part 2

As was noted in part 1 of this article, by 1910 some 115,000 southern and eastern European immigrants had settled in the eleven state region that had earlier comprised the Confederate States of America. The most numerous immigrant element to enter the region by that date were Italians, 44,358 in number, residing chiefly along the Gulf Coast and in the Mississippi River Valley.

Upcoming Post: The New South, Part 2

by 1910 some 115,000 southern and eastern European immigrants had settled in the eleven state region that had earlier comprised the Confederate States of America. The most numerous immigrant element to enter the region by that date were Italians, 44,358 in number, residing chiefly along the Gulf Coast and in the Mississippi River Valley. I now propose to look at the experience of this particular group as a case study of the South’s reaction to this New Immigrant influx.

Upcoming Post: The New South, Part 1

In the aftermath of the Civil war, Southern leaders consider the possibility of substituting imported white for black labor. This two part essay is concerned with a limited aspect of the prolonged campaign to induce white labor to turn south. It will consider, in particular, the efforts to procure a larger share of European immigration for the region.

From Kennesaw Mountain to the Chattahoochee River: General Johnston’s Lost Opportunity to Save Atlanta?

The commanders during the Atlanta Campaign, Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston (left) and Union General William Tecumseh Sherman (right) The article takes an in-depth look at the middle phase of the Atlanta Campaign, from the withdrawal of General Joseph Johnston's Confederate army from the battlefield at Kennesaw Mountain on the night of July 2, 1864, …

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From Kennesaw Mountain to the Chatahoochee River The article takes an in-depth look at the middle phase of the Atlanta Campaign, from the withdrawal of General Joseph Johnston's Confederate army from the battlefield at Kennesaw Mountain on the night of July 2, 1864, to the largely uncontested crossing of the Chattahoochee River by General William …

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Abolition Scorned: Boston’s Response to Antislavery

  The radical abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison Modern Bostonians take pride in the Hub’s association with the anti-slavery crusade. It was here, we are fond of reminding outsiders, that the militantly antislavery newspaper the Liberator was founded in 1831 by radical abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison and that the most resolutely abolitionist organization in the United …

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John Eliot and Nonantum

Reverend John Eliot, the so-called “Apostle to the Indians” In the 1646 to 1674 period, the Reverend John Eliot of Roxbury, the so-called Apostle to the Indians, converted some 1100 Massachusetts natives to the Christian religion and played a central role in establishing fourteen “Praying Indian” communities in the eastern part of Massachusetts. Though not …

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In the years 1998 to 2001 I penned over 100 articles that appeared regularly on the pages of the Boston and Allston-Brighton Tab newspapers. I will be posting a number of the more interesting and provocative of these pieces on this blog in the weeks to come. The two that follow will parallel articles in …

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Further Notes on Salvucci Family History

The following post was written by Fred Salvucci and presented at the Salvucci Family Reunion on March 27, 2004 The Salvucci family lived in San Gimignano, near Florence, Tuscany, in the 14th century. They were involved in a major feud with a rival family, the Ardinghelli, that was part of the civic strife in Italian …

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