From Kennesaw Mountain to the Chattahoochee River: General Johnston’s Lost Opportunity to Save Atlanta?

The commanders during the Atlanta Campaign, Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston (left) and Union General William Tecumseh Sherman (right) The article takes an in-depth look at the middle phase of the Atlanta Campaign, from the withdrawal of General Joseph Johnston's Confederate army from the battlefield at Kennesaw Mountain on the night of July 2, 1864, …

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From Kennesaw Mountain to the Chatahoochee River The article takes an in-depth look at the middle phase of the Atlanta Campaign, from the withdrawal of General Joseph Johnston's Confederate army from the battlefield at Kennesaw Mountain on the night of July 2, 1864, to the largely uncontested crossing of the Chattahoochee River by General William …

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Abolition Scorned: Boston’s Response to Antislavery

  The radical abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison Modern Bostonians take pride in the Hub’s association with the anti-slavery crusade. It was here, we are fond of reminding outsiders, that the militantly antislavery newspaper the Liberator was founded in 1831 by radical abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison and that the most resolutely abolitionist organization in the United …

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John Eliot and Nonantum

Reverend John Eliot, the so-called “Apostle to the Indians” In the 1646 to 1674 period, the Reverend John Eliot of Roxbury, the so-called Apostle to the Indians, converted some 1100 Massachusetts natives to the Christian religion and played a central role in establishing fourteen “Praying Indian” communities in the eastern part of Massachusetts. Though not …

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In the years 1998 to 2001 I penned over 100 articles that appeared regularly on the pages of the Boston and Allston-Brighton Tab newspapers. I will be posting a number of the more interesting and provocative of these pieces on this blog in the weeks to come. The two that follow will parallel articles in …

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Further Notes on Salvucci Family History

The following post was written by Fred Salvucci and presented at the Salvucci Family Reunion on March 27, 2004 The Salvucci family lived in San Gimignano, near Florence, Tuscany, in the 14th century. They were involved in a major feud with a rival family, the Ardinghelli, that was part of the civic strife in Italian …

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Some Historical Notes on the Family of Pietro Salvucci

This account is based chiefly on a 1977 oral interview with Loreto Salvucci, and was prepared by Bill Marchione for the Salvucci Family Reunion, held on March 27, 2004 My great grandfather, Pietro Salvucci, was the first member of his family to reach America, arriving in 1898. He was the eldest child of Carmine Salvucci …

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The Italian Immigrant Experience – Pt.2

The Salvucci and Sacchetti Families San Donato val di Comino, Italy, the home base of the Salvucci clan, a mountainside village in Italy’s Lazio region about 90 miles southeast of Rome in an area known as the Ciociaria. My mother’s family, the Salvuccis, came from the town of San Donato val di Comino, Province of Frosinone, …

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The Italian Immigrant Experience – Pt.1

  The Marchione, Consolmagno, and Costanza Families The “birds of passage” phenomenon saw millions of Italian males emigrate to America in the late 19th and early 20th without their families, oftentimes spending years in this country before bringing over their wives and children and making a permanent commitment to this country.  This phenomenon had an …

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