Annexation Embraced: Brighton’s 1873 Acceptance of Boston

  On October 7, 1873 the voters of the independent towns of Brookline and Brighton made sharply contrasting decisions on the question of annexation to the City of Boston. While two-thirds of Brookline’s electors rejected merger with the metropolis, fully 81 percent of Brighton’s electors eagerly embraced the opportunity to join the city. Why did …

Continue reading Annexation Embraced: Brighton’s 1873 Acceptance of Boston

Upcoming Post’s: Annexation Spurned: Brookline’s 1873 Rejection of Boston & Annexation Embraced: Brighton’s 1873 Acceptance of Boston

On October 7, 1873 the voters of the independent towns of Brookline and Brighton made sharply contrasting decisions on the question of annexation to the City of Boston. While two-thirds of Brookline’s electors rejected merger with the metropolis, fully 81 percent of Brighton’s electors eagerly embraced the opportunity to join the city. Why did these …

Continue reading Upcoming Post’s: Annexation Spurned: Brookline’s 1873 Rejection of Boston & Annexation Embraced: Brighton’s 1873 Acceptance of Boston

The Jonquil Historical Trail, Part 2

[31] The Mount Zion Baptist Church and Adjacent African-American Cemetery Site (1877). The Mt. Zion Baptist Church was organized to serve the growing African-American community of Davenport Town, a small community situated on the eastern edge of Smyrna.  In 1877, the Rev. George Lloyd and others organized this church. The first pastor was the Rev. …

Continue reading The Jonquil Historical Trail, Part 2

Upcoming Post: The Jonquil Historical Trail, Part 1

Smyrna, Georgia also known as the Jonquil City has been witness to many intriguing historical events and notable characters over is long and storied past. In Part's 1 and 2 of this series I will publish the full first draft of the proposal presented to the city government for the Jonquil City Historical Trail.

The New South and the New Immigrant, Part 2

As was noted in part 1 of this article, by 1910 some 115,000 southern and eastern European immigrants had settled in the eleven state region that had earlier comprised the Confederate States of America. The most numerous immigrant element to enter the region by that date were Italians, 44,358 in number, residing chiefly along the Gulf Coast and in the Mississippi River Valley.

Upcoming Post: The New South, Part 2

by 1910 some 115,000 southern and eastern European immigrants had settled in the eleven state region that had earlier comprised the Confederate States of America. The most numerous immigrant element to enter the region by that date were Italians, 44,358 in number, residing chiefly along the Gulf Coast and in the Mississippi River Valley. I now propose to look at the experience of this particular group as a case study of the South’s reaction to this New Immigrant influx.

Upcoming Post: The New South, Part 1

In the aftermath of the Civil war, Southern leaders consider the possibility of substituting imported white for black labor. This two part essay is concerned with a limited aspect of the prolonged campaign to induce white labor to turn south. It will consider, in particular, the efforts to procure a larger share of European immigration for the region.